Due to the escalation of the coronavirus outbreak, local destinations for outdoor recreation may be closed. Please visit official websites for more information.

5 Cool Rock Climbing Spots in North Carolina

By Anna Glazebrook

5 Cool Rock Climbing Spots in North Carolina

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Rock climbing is a sport unlike any other. Often, the thrill of the hike, climb, and the moment of reaching the top is unforgettable. Whether you’re a novice climber or a seasoned explorer, North Carolina has something unique to offer you. Grab your rock climbing gear and hit the trails with these five cool climbing spots in North Carolina.  

1. Moore’s Wall

Located inside of Hanging Rock State Park, Moore’s Wall offers a variety of grades any climber can enjoy. Best climbed in April or May, the boulder is made up of metamorphic quartzite crag, of the Piedmont. For the full day’s experience, walk the Moore’s Wall Trail to the Moore’s Wall for your climb. Once you climb, you can view over the treetops for as far as the eye can see. Maybe even capture a photo or two of the gorgeous view you just worked for.  

2. Stone Mountain State Park

Taking anywhere from one to eight hours to complete, visit the 600-foot boulder during the fall, winter, or spring to climb the granite for yourself. This more difficult climb is popular among guests for its ability to be climbed without too much trouble during the chilly months. Prime time to taking advantage of climbing at Stone Mountain is November. With your climb, you are awarded incredible views of the park. 

3. Crowders Mountain State Park

Named as one of the best climbs in the Central Piedmont, there is a range of difficulty from intermediate to expert. Crowders Mountain has a summit of more than 600 feet above the Piedmont giving the breathtaking views that allow climbers to see as far as Kings Mountain and Charlotte. Kings Mountain is another popular stop for guests but Crowders Mountain, hence the name, is a climber’s paradise.  

4. Laurel Knob

Located in the Cashiers Valley, accessing and climbing Laurel Knob first requires an approximate two-hour hike in and about three hours out. Best climbed in October or November, Laurel Knob is for the experienced climber ready for a challenge. This unique experience is well worth the hike to climb the granite dome which is, in fact, the tallest crag east of Mississippi.

5. Chimney Rock State Park

Climbing is open on the south face of Rumbling Bald Mountain for those eager to climb. Climb to the top, and you will experience the gorgeous views of Lake Lure and the surrounding areas. Climbers of all ability levels are welcome to enjoy the climb. But, those new to rock climbing should be accompanied by someone of experience for safety.  

Due to the escalation of the coronavirus outbreak, local destinations for outdoor recreation may be closed. Please visit official websites for more information.

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