5 Energizing Hikes in Connecticut

By Kimberly Ripley

5 Energizing Hikes in Connecticut

A challenging hike will leave you tired, but in the very best way. Sure, you might feel a few twinges in your muscles from the exertion, but you’ll feel invigorated and accomplished at the same time. These five energizing hikes in Connecticut fit the bill. Check one out the next time you hear the trails calling. 

1. Mattatuck Trail

You’ll be energized after hiking Mattatuck Trail near Thomaston. With 36 miles, this wooded trail is perfect for hikers looking for a challenge (you don’t have to traverse the whole thing at once, though!) Your canine friends are welcome, too, but they must be leashed.

2. MDC Reservoir #6, West Hartford, Connecticut

With 3,000 acres of woodland trails, there are hikes for every ability at MDC Reservoir #6. In addition to the hiking trails, there are 30 miles of paved and gravel roads. The area is known for some of the best woodlands views in the state. Try out the 3.6-mile red loop. Check their map online to figure out where you’re headed!  

3. Hurd State Park

Hiking Hurd State Park finds you passing by the Connecticut River, as well as through heavily-wooded areas. Those looking for a route even more energizing will love the paths that ascend to much higher ground. They afford brilliant views of the river valley.

4. Oswegatchie Hills Nature Preserve

Hike on rock ridges, past a ravine that was created by glaciers, and more at this preserve. Oswegatchie Hills is a stunning spot replete with wildlife. Birders love it here. There are roughly seven miles of trails in the area to explore! Do it during the fall, and experience some of the most incredible natural beauty you’ve ever seen. 

5. Chauncey Peak Trail

This trail, located near Meriden, Connecticut, is rated as moderate and one of the most scenic hikes in the state. On this two-mile hike, explorers will be able to soak in views of the immaculate Crescent Lake dam. The area features trees such as elm, maple, black birch, flowering dogwood, and more. It will take you roughly 2-3 hours to traverse and the area is dog-friendly, too! 

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