5 Energizing Hikes in Massachusetts

By Kimberly Ripley

5 Energizing Hikes in Massachusetts

For a hike that invigorates both mind and body, there are an abundance of routes through Massachusetts’ dense forests and alongside reservoirs to explore. Being in the great outdoors provides a true sense of refreshment and renewal. For a more rejuvenating trek, check out these five energizing hikes in Massachusetts. 

1. Bear Hole Reservoir Trail

Perfect for intermediate hikers, Bear Hole Reservoir Trail features about three miles on a moderate loop. Best hiking is April through November, as snow or ice adds some difficulty to the trail. Dogs are welcome to hike, too.

2. Otter River State Forest

Hike some winding trails through this beautiful expanse of forest that makes passes near Lake Dennison and Beaman Pond. Otter River State Forest Trails are available year-round, and are used by snowshoers and cross-country skiers in the winter months. 

3. Jacobs Hill

On Jacobs Hill, hikers will enjoy more than two miles of trails—lots of incline—that hug the ridgeline of the hill. This isn’t a hike that’s recommended for young children, but adults accustomed to moderate/intermediate hikes will navigate it quite successfully. Those doing the entire hike will encounter Spirit Falls—a beautiful spot where a camera is a must.

4. Ponkapoag Pond at Blue Hills Reservation

Blue Hills Reservation features trails suited for a variety of skill levels. From more leisurely strolls to strenuous treks, hikers will find quite a bit of diversity here.  The Ponkapoag Pond trail is 3.75 miles and deemed moderate. It will take about 2.5-3 hours to traverse. This is a secluded hike and moves along the largest and most remote body of water within the reservation. 

5. Cross Fells Trail at Middlesex Fells Reservation

There are several trails to explore at the beautiful Middlesex Fells Reservation that covers 2,200 acres. Simply nicknamed “the Fells,” this area features over 100 miles of trails for hiking, mountain biking, cross-country skiing, and horseback riding. For a more challenging route, try out the Cross Fells Trail—a 4.5-mile trek that takes five hours to traverse in one direction. 

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