As local communities continue to update Covid-19 regulations, local destinations for outdoor recreation may be closed. Please visit official websites for the latest information.

5 Perfect Fall Camping Spots in Texas

By Ian-Spiegel Blum

5 Perfect Fall Camping Spots in Texas

This fall, take in the amazing bigtooth maple trees, delight in the cottonwoods, and relish Texas’ massive oaks while appreciating the changing colors of the leaves. For the best views, consider camping at the following five perfect spots in Texas.  

1. Lost Maples State Natural Area

The Lost Maples State Natural Area is one of the most exquisite sites for fall foliage in the Lone Star State. While beautiful colors are one of Lost Maple’s year-round delights, the fall colors, particularly in their bigtooth maple trees, attract campers from far and wide. Thirty campsites with water and electricity exist in the area, along with six primitive campsites.

2. Daingerfield State Park

Treat yourself to incredible views of sweetgum, oak, and piney woods in the Daingerfield State Park. The park recently underwent a $5 million renovation and upgrade, and now offers campsites for tents and RVs, as well as group facilities and cabins. 

3. Cooper Lake State Park

Cooper Lake is one of the summer’s busiest state parks, but fall might be the best time to visit. With school back in session, you’ll have less families to contend with for the limited campsites. They have sites with water and electricity, walk-in campsites, cabins, and equestrian campsites. Ride your house down the 10.5-mile Buggy Whip Equestrian Trail to take in the more than 600 acres of shaded forest. 

4. Caprock Canyons State Park and Trailway

With over 90 miles of trails and free-roaming bison galore, the Caprock Canyons State Park and Trailway offers a unique camping experience. Fall campers will enjoy the hiking, horse and bike riding, geocaching, picnicking, and fishing options. Choose from water and electric campsites, water-only sites, primitive sites, or eight equestrian campsites. 

5. Palo Duro Canyon State Park

Palo Duro Canyon State Park is home to the second largest canyon in the country, also known as the Grand Canyon of Texas. Fall is one of the best times to visit, as you’ll more easily be able to explore the more than 30 miles of hiking, biking, and equestrian trails. Campsites include those with water and electricity, primitive drive-up sites, backpack camping areas, equestrian sites, cabins, and a pavilion. 

As local communities continue to update Covid-19 regulations, local destinations for outdoor recreation may be closed. Please visit official websites for the latest information.