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Palouse Falls State Park

23 miles southeast of Washtucna
360-902-8844

The Palouse River runs through a narrow cataract and drops 200 feet to a churning bowl. From there, the current moves swiftly, through a winding gorge of columnar basalt, to its southern end at the mighty Snake River.

All Washingtonians, visitors to the region and Ice Age floods fans should see Palouse Falls State Park at least once in their lifetime.

Carved more than 13,000 years ago, Palouse Falls is among the last active waterfalls on the Ice Age floods path. This natural wonder was named Washington's state waterfall in 2014, when the state Legislature passed a bill written by local schoolchildren, who advocated for the designation.

Palouse Falls is an artist's dream, and many a painter or shutterbug has set up an easel or camera and tripod to capture the falls in the changing light. Others make the trip in all four seasons, when the water is high, low or frozen, because they understand that once is not enough when it comes to seeing Washington's own state waterfall.

PARK FEATURES
This 94-acre park has limited, first-come, first-served tent camping and is known as an ideal picnic and birding spot.

The park offers three distinct views of the falls. The lower viewpoint provides a direct view; it is reached by a set of steps from the main day-use area adjacent to the parking lot. The second, at the end of a paved interpretive path, tells the story of the secluded canyon. Both the interpretive path and gravel secondary parking area lead to the third and highest viewpoint, the Fryxell Overlook, offering panoramic views of the falls and Palouse River Canyon.

Visitors should be prepared for a remote recreational experience. There is no phone service at the park, and staff and volunteer hosts are not always available.

Please follow Leave No Trace principles, and experience this viewshed from the designated, developed areas. Your positive stewardship protects cultural and natural resources.

ADA AMENITIES/FACILITIES

Campground
0.1-mile walking path
Restroom
Viewpoints
Picnic area

PICNIC & DAY-USE FACILITIES
The park provides one picnic shelter with a table and brazier, seven uncovered braziers, 15 unsheltered picnic tables, and 2 acres of picnicking area. Picnic sites are first come, first served. This park is a cash or check only location. Due to technical issues no credit card kiosk is available.

ACTIVITIES

WALKING PATH
0.1 mile ADA walking path

OTHER ACTIVITIES & FEATURES
Bird watching
Waterfall viewing
Wildlife viewing

CAMPSITE INFORMATION
This park has a tent-only campground with 11 primitive campsites and a pit toilet. One tent site is ADA accessible. Each space can accommodate up to two tents and four people. Sites have no hookups. Each space includes a picnic table and fire pit. Braziers are available. Drinking water is available from April to October. All campsites are first come, first served. For information call the park at (509) 646-9218.

Check-in time is 2:30 p.m.
Check-out time is 1 p.m.


Photos

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